Thursday, December 31, 2009


I think this kid has potential......taken at Detroit Autorama 09

P.S. any of you people asking 'cause of yesterdays post; yes a Lowbrow Backyard Bash is in the works for this spring, I am workin on our show schedule today and we will see what this next year looks like!

Wednesday, December 30, 2009


Wow, been a crazy holiday tons of orders here and we worked like mad to try and get everything out to everyone in time for Christmas! If it didn't get there on time blame it on the US Postal Service! Tyler and Larissa's daughter had her first Christmas and saw santa. I got my jaw unwired Christmas eve and ate all day, vietnamese food, prime rib, pizza, anything in front of me basically! Hope evryone out there had a great Christmas, and hope you all have a great New Year!

Thursday, December 24, 2009

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!


I am about to go get the wires cut on my jaw.....6 weeks....no solid food......down 25 lbs.....this is what I am dreaming of...........

MEERY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Part III: Mods vs. Rockers.......

In May 1964 News stories stated that mods and rockers were jailed in seaside resort towns on the south coast of England, such as Margate, Brighton, Bournemout, and Clacton for large scale fighting, public rioting, and destruction. Although this was true, the media distorted these altercations massively. It can be safely said that the media itself may have helped to instigate these confrontations. The persistent media reporting created a sharp division between the Mods and Rockers. Prior to the reporting, there was no major rivalry or hatred between the Mods and Rockers. Through the media's distortion and manipulation of the event, the rivalry between the Mods and Rockers was amplified and a moral panic was created amongst the public. That is, as a result of the exaggerated media reports, the general public imagined the Mods and Rockers to be deviants, and became outraged at their behavior.

Fights occurred where territories overlapped or rival factions happened upon each other. There was an urban–rural split, meaning that the groups could only fight if brought together for some reason – most often the seaside during summer. Common weapons carried were blackjacks, chains and switch blades. On Easter weekend in 1964, the rivalry created by the media between the Mods and Rockers finally boiled over in the town of Clacton. The fight between the two gangs resulted in several broken windows and the destruction of some beach huts. However, the media reported the altercation in national newspapers, suggesting there had been large scale riots and wholesale breakdown of public order. In actual fact, the incidents were not serious and gained little attention in the local press. It seems that in the absence of other newsworthy material, the national press, including the "New York Times" and "New York Herald Tribune", focused upon these rather harmless events. Headlines such as "they are hell-bent for destruction" were created as well as feature articles which suggested that the Mods and Rockers had intentionally set out to cause serious trouble.

Round two took place on the south coast of England, where Londoners head for seaside resorts on Bank Holidays. Over the Whitsun weekend (May 18 and 19, 1964), thousands of mods descended upon Margate,Broadstairs and Brighton to find that an inordinately large number of rockers had made the same holiday plans. Within a short time, marauding gangs of mods and rockers were openly fighting, often using pieces of deckchairs. The worst violence was at Brighton, where fights lasted two days and moved along the coast to Hastings and back. A small number of rockers were isolated on Brighton beach where they – despite being protected by police – were overwhelmed and assaulted by mods. The Brighton riots were later immortalised as the centrepiece of the cult film ‘Quadrophenia’.


Newspapers described the mod and rocker clashes as being of "disastrous proportions", and labelled mods and rockers as "sawdust Caesars", "vermin" and "louts". Newspaper editorials fanned the flames of hysteria, such as a Birmingham Post editorial in May 1964, which warned that mods and rockers were "internal enemies" in the UK who would "bring about disintegration of a nation's character". As a result of this media coverage, two British Members of Parliament travelled to the seaside areas to survey the damage, and MP Harold Gurden called for a resolution for intensified measures to control hooliganism.

Eventually, when the media ran out of real fights to report, they would publish deceptive headlines, such as using a subheading "Violence", even when the article reported that there was no violence at all. Newspaper writers also began to use "free association" to link mods and rockers with various social issues, such as teen pregnancy, contraceptives, amphetamines, and violence.

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Part II: The Mods.....

The term mod derives from modernist, which was a term used in the 1950s to describe modern jazz musicians and fans. Jobling and Crowley called the mod subculture a "fashion-obsessed and hedonistic cult of the hyper-cool" young adults who lived in metropolitan London or the new towns of the south. Due to the increasing affluence of post-war Britain, the youths of the early 1960s were one of the first generations that did not have to contribute their money from after-school jobs to the family finances. As mod teens and young adults began using their disposable income to buy stylish clothes, the first youth-targeted boutique clothing stores opened in London in the Carnaby Street and Kings Road districts.(wikipedia)


Many mods used motorscooters for transportation, usually Vespas or Lambrettas. Scooters had provided inexpensive transportation for decades before the development of the mod subculture, but the mods stood out in the way that they treated the vehicle as a fashion accessory. Italian scooters were preferred due to their clean lined, curving shapes and gleaming chrome. For young mods, Italian scooters were the "embodiment of continental style and a way to escape the working-class row houses of their upbringing". They customized their scooters by painting them with customs metalflake and two tone paint jobs. It was also common to accessorize them with mirrors, luggage racks, crash bars, fog lights, and chrome.

Scooters were also a practical and accessible form of transportation for 1960s teens. In the early 1960s, public transport stopped relatively early in the night, and so having scooters allowed mods to stay out all night at dance clubs and coffee shops. To keep their expensive suits clean and keep warm while riding, mods often wore long army parkas. For teens with low-end jobs, scooters were cheaper than cars, and they could be bought on a payment plan through newly-available Hire purchase plans. After a law was passed requiring at least one mirror be attached to every motorcycle, mods were known to add four, ten, or as many as 30 mirrors to their scooters. The cover of The Who's album Quadrophenia, (which includes themes related to mods and rockers), depicts a young man on a Vespa GS with four mirrors attached.

Like most gangs of their time, The Mods had a very distinct, yet common interest in music. While the Beatles were enjoying immense popularity and success among Britain's mainstream society in the early 1960's, the first-wave of Mods pursued a different sound, modern jazz. They were attracted to the "cool" demeanor and clothing possessed by jazz musicians, and strived to emulate their style. As jazz grew in popularity, Mods began listening to Blues, Soul, Rhythm & Blues, and then moved on to Jamaican Bluebeat and Ska to stay ahead of the mainstream. The Mods sparked a nationwide enthusiasm for Rhythm & Blues music that surpassed Jazz as the music of choice for young adults. They preferred the British bands who played a Rhythm & Blues style of music, such as The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds, The Pretty Things, The Kinks, The Cyril Davis All-Stars, The Downliners, and The Small Faces.The most popular and revolutionary band who could be labeled as Mods themselves were the High Numbers, later renamed The Who. They wore Mod outfits, had Mod hairstyles, and sang blues-based songs about being Mods, such as "I'm the Face", and "My Generation".

Friday, December 18, 2009

Remembering Bud Ekins...

Here’s a quote from Trailblazers about Bud’s racing career:
“In the 1950s, Bud Ekins was one of the first Americans to compete in Europe in the World Championship Motocross Grand Prix circuit. He also earned gold medals in the International Six Day Trial (now International Six Day Enduro). When he returned from Europe, Ekins dominated desert events. In 1955, riding a Triumph, Ekins won the Catalina Grand Prix. He also won the Big Bear Run - three times!”

Bud & Steve McQueen at the start of the 1964 Greenhorn Enduro

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Mods vs. Rockers....Part I: The Rockers

The Mods and Rockers were two conflicting British youth subcultures of the early-mid 1960s. Gangs of mods and rockers fighting in 1964 sparked a moral panic about British youths, and the two groups were seen as folk devils. The rockers adopted a macho biker gang image, wearing clothes such as black leather jackets. The mods adopted a pose of scooter-driving sophistication, wearing suits and other cleancut outfits.

The rockers were influenced by American music and films, prospertiy in the working class segments, new road construction around British cities, and the development of transport cafes (pronounced "caffs" by rockers of that period) that became their haunts. These factors coincided with a peak in British motorcycle engineering. Although rocker-style youths existed in the 1950s, they were known as ton up boys because ton-up was English slang for driving 100 mph (160 km/h). It wasn't until the 1960s that they became known as rockers and they were immersed in rockabilly music and fashions and began to be known as much for their devotion to rock and roll music as they were for their motorcycles.

The first rockers were primarily known for their motorcycles, standard factory-made motorcycles they stripped down, tuned them up and modified them to appear like racing bikes. By the 1960s, their subculture became associated with a specific music genre and clothing style. Many rockers mostly favored 1950s and early-1960s rock and roll by artists such as Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Elvis Presley. The rocker's style was born out of necessity and practicality. They wore leather motorcycle jackets covered with metal studs, patches, and pins. They usually sported open-face helmets, aviator goggles, and sometimes a white silk scarf. Leather caps called Kagneys, Levi's jeans, leather trousers, tall motorcycle boots (often made by Lewis Leathers), engineer boots, brothel creepers, T-shirts and Daddy-O-style shirts were also pretty common.



The first rockers were primarily known for their motorcycles, standard factory-made motorcycles they stripped down, tuned them up and modified them to appear like racing bikes. By the 1960s, their subculture became associated with a specific music genre and clothing style. Many rockers mostly favored 1950s and early-1960s rock and roll by artists such as Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Elvis Presley. The rocker's style was born out of necessity and practicality. They wore leather motorcycle jackets covered with metal studs, patches, and pins. They usually sported open-face helmets, aviator goggles, and sometimes a white silk scarf. Leather caps called Kagneys, Levi's jeans, leather trousers, tall motorcycle boots (often made by Lewis Leathers), engineer boots, brothel creepers, T-shirts and Daddy-O-style shirts were also pretty common. The rockers were influenced by American music and films, prospertiy in the working class segments, new road construction around British cities, and the development of transport cafes (pronounced "caffs" by rockers of that period) that became their haunts. These factors coincided with a peak in British motorcycle engineering. Although rocker-style youths existed in the 1950s, they were known as ton up boys because ton-up was English slang for driving 100 mph (160 km/h). It wasn't until the 1960s that they became known as rockers and they were immersed in rockabilly music and fashions and began to be known as much for their devotion to rock and roll music as they were for their motorcycles.
More of the story coming soon......

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Here's a pic of Hoss's bike, featuring some of our parts which will be unveiled at the Cleveland International Motorcycle Show Jan 29-31. Look forward to seein it then man!

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Nutty Mads..........

Yeah I know, its like did I stumble into some dorky toy blog? Wheres the motorcycle stuff? Well it's Christmas time, and these are toys I still buy! I think they're cool as hell and alot of people have never seen anything like em.


(yeah if you wanna buy me a gift these two would be good ones)

These figures were originally released by Marx in 1963-64 for about 15 cents each. These freaky lowbrow creatures were released in nearly as many different colors as their are figures. They feature crazy characters in bizzaro poses cast in great detail. The figures mostly range between 4 and 6 inches tall.

The color of the figures impacts the price nearly as much as condition with the blue, maroon and bright red figures being especially popular. You can find common figures in good shape for $10-$15. The harder to find figures in rare colors can bring over $100.



Like many of the popular Marx six-inch figures, Nutty Mads were reissued in the 1970s and 80s but these are not worth nearly as much. A cool gift idea for fans of Lowbrow Art!

Monday, December 14, 2009

Vintage Hill Climbs....


Definition-"Hillclimbs are essentially one-person drag race up the face of a challenging hill, with each rider allowed at least two attempts to conquer the hill. The winner is the rider who climbs the hill the quickest or, if no one reaches the top, makes it the farthest."
Jump on an unmodificed vintage motorcycle and charge up a steep hill and get as far as you can. Sounds easy right? Maybe this video will give you a new perspective.....

Sunday, December 13, 2009

The Ton-Up Boys....

The Ton-Up Boys were a British biker subculture that started in the 1950s and were successors to theTeddy Boys in attitude, language and values. However, instead of mock-Edwardian clothing styles, they took their style from Marlon Brando's film The Wild Ones, and from Royal Air Force pilots of World War II. They rode British motorcycles, traveled in packs and hung out in transport cafes. Ton-Up is a slang term coming from the cafe racer culture of 1950s England, referring to the 100 mph speed limit.

The subculture was heavily influenced by American rockabilly music. Musicians who were popular among Ton-Up boys included Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, Billy Fury, and Elvis Presley. Ton-Up Boys commonly wore leather motorcycle jackets, Levi 501 jeans or leather trousers, and engineer boots, tall motorcycle boots or creeper shoes. Helmets, although not required at the beginning of the 1950s, later became compulsory. Ton-Up Boys usually wore jet helmets, often with aviator goggles for night riding. The look was accentuated with a silk scarf worn around the neck for protection against the elements, and long wool socks pulled over the top of the boots, both of these looks were borrowed from the RAF.

The main difference between Ton-Up Boys of the 1950s and the Rockers they evolved into in 1960s were the heavily studded, patched and pinned leather jackets that Rockers wore, whereas the Ton-Up Boys usually preferred their jackets clean or with painted motifs on the back, a look that was adopted from World War II pilots. The film The Leather Boys (1964) acurately portrays the bikes and styles of the original Ton-Up Boys.





Saturday, December 12, 2009

Its a Sat...I'm working...and feeling lazy.... so this is it


"Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting."


Just a quote from my man McQueen.........



Friday, December 11, 2009

Devils and Angels.........



Lowbrow Art, Hot Rods, Customs & Girls. We got interviews with all sortsa cool folks. We've corralled Japan's masters of striping Makoto, Mr. G and Grimb.

We also take a close-up look in studio with the amazing Doug Dorr, get a peek inside the twisted mind of Jeral Tidwell and spend the day with Hot Rod/Surf Art legend Damian Fulton. We see up close the artists at work, and at play, and see what makes these characters tick...

Take a ride with the Straight Jacket Kustoms car club to the Grand National Roadster Show, 'Weld This' Art Show, and finally Gasoline Gallery's 'California Screamin' Art & Hot Rod Show.

Feature run time over 1 hour, with extras
This is an All Region DVD and features English & Japanese subtitles.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Icy Riders....Check this DVD out!


ICY RIDERS

Buy it here...LowbrowCustoms

I pulled one of these DVDs off the shelf the other day and sat down to watch it last night....and all I can say is awesome. These guys are insane and Posa the rider they follow in the film is 59, riding on the ice for over 30 years. It is truly impressive. This film is about an hour long, really well shot with tons of great racing and multiple locations. It is mostly in Sweedish but well subtitled so it doesn't matter. Theres also an extra hour of special features including more race footage, vintage ice racing, and a mini documentary on the basics of ice riding. Made me wanna go spike my big wheels tires and hit the pond!

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

The death of the "Murderdromes"



The first board track opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum Motordome near Playa del Ray, CA, on April 8, 1910. Based on and utilizing the same technology as the French velodromes used for bicycle races, the track and others like it were created with 2" by 4"boards, and banked up to 45°. The banking in the corners of board tracks started at 25° in 1911, like bicycles tracks were. The banking was increased until 60° was common! The effect of the banking was higher cornering speed and higher G-force on drivers.

Fans sat on the top of the track looking down at the racers. When a driver lost control in a corner, he could slip up off the track and into the crowd. An incident often killed a half-dozen competitors and spectators at a time. On September 8, 1912, Eddie Hasha was killed at the New Jersey Motodrome. The accident killed 4 boys and injured 10 more people. The deaths made the front page of the New York Times. The press started calling the short 1/4 and 1/3 mile circuits "murderdromes".

The 1913 motorcycle championship races were moved to a dirt track because dirt was safer. The national organization overseeing motorcycle racing on board tracks banned all competitions on board tracks shorter than 1-mile in 1919. Board tracks slowly faded away by the 1920s and 1930s. A damn shame....



Tuesday, December 8, 2009

The Hollywood Connection



I have no problem admiting these guys had a huge impact on me when I was a kid and on my view of motorcycles. I knew they were cool and my mother didn't like that.......

Monday, December 7, 2009

More old racers



Some more cool vintage racing photos....inspiration.........

Sunday, December 6, 2009

Saturday, December 5, 2009

Who made these you ask?


Just a couple newer bikes coming out of France of all places. Customs built Triumphs, a scrambler model and a racer model. Upgraded handling and performance by a company called Mecatwin. I have to say these give me some ideas too. I am a pretty big fan of those rearsets on the racer model!

Friday, December 4, 2009

Pioneers


Just some old racing photos...food for thought on my new Triumph project.......I love the old flat track and desert racer look. And these guys had brass balls too, doing what they did with that technology, and no safety gear by todays standards.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Christmas Gift!

This is pretty fuckin cool, Leo from here in ohio sent us this as a Xmas gift! He painted the sign in purple metalflake the hand striped it, and painted our logo on it. To finish it off he did some copper leaf, he said he was gonna do gold leaf, but he thought that was a little too high-brow for us! This will be proudly hung in the new addition to our shop next week. Thanks Leo!

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Tyler's desert ride

I think Bill form Biltwell snapped this rad pic of Tyler riding down to the salton sea on Mcgoo's Bmw

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Man of steel...errr titanium

I'm part titanium now!